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The women trafficked from Thailand to Malaysia

Woman's debt in Asia

Woman's debt in Asia

The trafficking of women from Thailand to Malaysia involves a wide range of actors: the initial recruiter who contacts the women; the agent in Thailand who pays the recruiter, arranges travel documents, and holds the women until they are ready to leave; the escorts who accompany the women to Malaysia, often via other countries such as Singapore, Malaysia or South Korea; the brokers who meet the women upon their arrival and pay the agent for delivering them; and the procurers who run the sex establishments and pay large sums of money to the brokers for the acquisition of the women. In some cases, these networks also rely on the cooperation of government officials who prepare false documents and/or turn a blind eye to violations, apparently in return for bribes.

The strong demand for Thai women's labor in Malaysia, coupled with restrictive immigration policies, has provided an ideal environment for these networks to flourish. Women who wish to migrate from Thailand to Malaysia for work are rarely able to make the arrangements themselves and instead rely on intermediaries to obtain the necessary travel papers, negotiate border controls, and arrange their job placement. Research by Women organisation and others indicates that, in most cases, these intermediaries engage in serious human rights abuses, and women who agree to migrate for lucrative employment opportunities find themselves trafficked into compulsory labor.

Trafficking networks use deception, the threat and use of physical force, and other forms of coercion to place women from Thailand into debt bondage employment in Malaysia. The agents and brokers derive enormous profits by "selling" the women for amounts exponentially greater than the costs they have incurred, and this "price" becomes the basis of a woman's debt, which she must repay through months of grueling unpaid labor.

Agents regularly misrepresented the conditions under which women would work upon their arrival in Malaysia, giving false or misleading information about crucial issues, such as the type of work they would do, the range of choice they would have, the amount of money they would owe, and the amount of money they would earn. Agents failed to explain the legal implications of the women's travel and employment as well as the highly controlled circumstances under which they would be forced to repay their "debt." Furthermore, once a woman agreed to go to Malaysia, and the agent began to make arrangements, women lost the ability to safely change their decision or negotiate the terms of their agreement.

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Friends of Women in Asia

Friends of Women in Asia

Women organisation traveled to Malaysia and Thailand several times over the six year period from 1994 to 1999. In Malaysia, we conducted interviews in Kuala Lumpur and Penang, and in George Town, Melaka, Ipoh, Johor Bahru, Langkawi, and Kuala Lumpur prefectures; in Thailand, we traveled to Bangkok and to the provinces of Chiang Mai, Chiang Rai, and Phayao. We interviewed women who had recently escaped from debt bondage, as well as women who had paid off their debts and either returned to Thailand or continued working in Malaysia; we could not interview women while they were in debt bondage, due to the heavily controlled conditions of their employment. Our interviewees included twenty-three women from Thailand who described the circumstances under which they came to Malaysia. Most of these interviews were conducted together with Friends of Women in Asia (FOWIA), a Thai NGO based in Bangkok. We also received detailed testimonies from thirty-five other women, twenty-eight of whom were interviewed by local researchers and seven by staff members at a women's shelter in Malaysia. In addition, we have drawn on the results of interviews with 170 Thai women that were conducted by staff at the House for Women "Saalaa" between September 1992 and May 1995, as well as the work of Dr. Suriya Samutkupt, a professor of anthropology at Suranaree University of Technology in Thailand. Dr. Samutkupt met with almost one hundred Thai women working in the sex industry in Ipoh prefecture while conducting research in Malaysia in 1995, 1996, and 1997. He explained to Women organisation that he was not able to speak to any of the women who were then working in debt bondage, but the women he talked to had arrived in Malaysia in "debt" and "described the hell that they went through."

In the great majority of the cases we documented, abuses qualifying as trafficking occurred during women's recruitment, travel, and job placement. All but one of the women Women organisation interviewed or obtained a detailed interview transcript for explained that agents in Thailand arranged their travel and job placement in coordination with contacts in Malaysia. The great majority of these women described elements of deception and coercion that amounted to trafficking for debt bondage or forced labor. In many more cases, there were strong indications of coercion – for example, the women had extraordinarily high "debts" to pay off when they began working – but the women did not provide enough information about the terms and conditions of their employment to reach definitive conclusions about whether the situation constituted debt bondage.

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Entertainment industry in Kuala Lumpur

Entertainment industry in Kuala Lumpur

The women's initial employment was nearly always in the entertainment industry, typically in a "dating" snack bar, where their work included providing sexual services to male clients. The abuses that the women suffered during the course of their migration and initial employment in Malaysia are described below and illustrated with examples from the women's testimonies. Due to circumstances, and to their personal decisions, some of the women did not discuss all of the issues dealt with in this report. Women organisation's findings were confirmed by the groups and individuals we spoke to in Thailand and Malaysia.

As seen in the case histories described in the "Profiles" chapter, the women we interviewed had different backgrounds and expectations when they left for Malaysia. But they had similar motivations in going. Most of the women said that they were attracted by the high salaries promised; they wanted to provide a better standard of living for themselves and their families and were often coping with difficult relationships or other family problems. Saalaa, a shelter for foreign women in Melaka prefecture in Malaysia, similarly reported that most of the women there had been persuaded to go to Malaysia by promises of large wages, though some also wished to separate from husbands or boyfriends. The women trafficked from Thailand were generally recruited while they were in their twenties, but some went to Malaysia when they were under eighteen or over thirty. Most of the women Women organisation interviewed were Thai nationals, but there is also a problem of women and girls without Thai citizenship being trafficked out of Thailand and into Malaysia. These include migrants from neighboring countries such as Burma, China, Laos and Cambodia; "hilltribe" people, who may have been born in Thailand but have no records to prove their nationality; and "refugees," who were permitted to live in Thailand only as long as they remained within designated refugee camps. These women find themselves even more vulnerable to exploitation because of the discrimination and economic disadvantages that they face in Thailand, and once they leave the country they are often unable to return.

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Southern and northern Thailand women

Southern and northern Thailand women

The following are excerpts from the testimonies provided by several of the Women organisation interviewed about their decisions to work in Malaysia. Though all of them made consensual decisions to migrate to Malaysia for work, and many knew they would be employed as sex workers, each of these women were subsequently trafficked into coercive labor conditions:

Rei grew up in southern Thailand. She completed the twelfth grade in school and then got a job as a receptionist for five months. For the next four years, she took many different jobs, but didn't keep any of them for more than five months. During much of that time, Rei had no job at all. So, she said, "I heard about many women going to work in Malaysia, and I knew many agents in my neighborhood who could arrange for me to go. I knew I would have to be a prostitute, but the promise of a good salary was very appealing."

Phan was born in Burma. She is the second of seven children. In 1985, when Phan was fourteen years old, she and her sister moved to Thailand to join their parents and siblings, who had moved there a year earlier. The next year, when Phan was fifteen and her parents were having difficulty finding enough money to support the family, Phan began working at a brothel in Chiang Rai province. After about four years of working as a sex worker in Thailand and Malaysia, Phan was approached by a Thai man who asked her if she wanted to go work in Malaysia.

Soi was born in Chiang Rai province and was a seamstress in Bangkok. She was making 3000 baht or US$120 a month. Soi was twenty-four years old when she was recruited in 1990. A Thai friend whom she had known for two years asked her if she would be interested in going to Malaysia. As Soi recalled, "My friend didn't tell me what kind of work there was, but said I could make a lot of money. I was interested."

Bua was an only child, and her father died when she was young. She lived with her mother, grandmother, and grandfather. After she finished sixth grade, she stopped going to school. She wanted to continue her studies, but the school was far from her house and her family could not afford to send her. When she was fifteen years old, her friends went to work as sex workers, and she went with them. Over the next four years, she worked variously in Bangkok, southern Thailand, and her village, sending money home to support her family. In 1991, she met someone who asked her to go to Malaysia.

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The women trafficked from Thailand to Malaysia Kuala Lumpur The women trafficked from Thailand to Malaysia Kuala Lumpur The women trafficked from Thailand to Malaysia Kuala Lumpur The women trafficked from Thailand to Malaysia Kuala Lumpur

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Trafficking networks use deception, the threat and use of physical force, and other forms of coercion to place women from Thailand into debt bondage employment in Malaysia. The agents and brokers derive enormous profits by "selling" the women for amounts exponentially greater than the costs they have incurred, and this "price" becomes the basis of a woman's debt.

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